Thursday , 27 November 2014
Home / Social Media Marketing / Fair Trade and Social Media: Watch & Learn 01 [@FairtradeUK]

Fair Trade and Social Media: Watch & Learn 01 [@FairtradeUK]

The more producers’ organizations we meet on the road, the more we understand the importance of Social Media as a way to promote your fair trade business. Indeed, Social Media is a great way to engage with potential new customers, give more information about your social project and products, but it is also very useful to keep an eye on market trends and latest fashions.

Ronny giving a Social Media training @Alura Amara, Indonesia.

About half the fair trade organizations we visited in Asia were already active on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube, the other half seemed really enthusiastic about getting started. Fair Trade Connection is all about connecting fair trade producers with consumers so we quickly understood that in order to do so, we needed to train the non-initiated so that they too could leverage the potential of Social Media Marketing.

The “Watch & Learn” series is a collection of Social Media best practices in the fair trade industry that we gathered and analyzed for you.

This 1st post will be analyzing the videos of the amazing “Take a step for Fairtrade” campaign by the Fairtrade Foundation. The @FairtradeUK in the title of this post is their Twitter name, so go ahead and follow them if you want.

Let’s jump to the heart of this campaign and start with the presentation video:

1/ The Campaign presentation Video

What we liked:

  • Strong Corporate Identity: the Fairtrade Foundation really does a good job being consistant with the look and feel of their messages. One should establish a corporate document stating which typography and fonts, colors and shades, logotypes and declinaison logos your company will be using to comunicate. And most importantly stick to it!
  • Appropriate Music: the rythm of the video is given by the music. See how the text is synchronized with the music. Sync your visuals with the music to create greater impact on your viewers.
  • Proper use of Sound Effects: the additional sound effects helps the viewer relate to what he’s seeing. It also gives a more profesionnal touch. There are lot’s of free sound banks on the web like Freesound.org and Soundbible.com
  • Interactive Video: Notice how you are invited to click to find out more at the end of the video. If you click inside the YouTube video you’ll be redirected to the campaign main website with the step-o-meter where you can register your step and learn all the details. To learn how to create interactive videos, we strongly suggest you watch this episode of the ReelSEO’s Creator’s Tip.

What we liked less:

  • Too many calls to action: the first time we watched the video we didn’t quite understand what we were supposed to do? Was it to click on the website’s link at the end of the movie? Was it to take a step? To register my step online or with a postcard? Because there were too many calls to action we got confused and didn’t really know where to start. Calls to actions are great, if not necessary if you want to succeed with online video marketing, but let’s keep it simple. Choose one call to action only so that the viewer knows exactly what he has to do.
  • Not enough time to click: the invitation to click on the website’s link at the end of the video didn’t last long enough. Interactivity in YouTube videos is still something new for most viewers, so you have to be very clear about what they should do and leave them enough time to click on your link. A good lenght is about 10 to 15 seconds.
  • Non-Clickable links in video description: one of the great things about YouTube videos is that their Title/Description/Tags can be used as SEO tools. One should really leverage these info to boost his visibility in the search engines (Google or YouTube). The Fairtrade Foundation’s mistake was not to be able to make the links clickable in the video description as shown in this picture: An easy way to avoid that is to paste the entire URL. Had they type: http://www.fairtrade.org.uk/step (thus not dropping the http://) the link would have been clickable.

2/ The other videos

What we liked:

  • Viral: It’s funny, I want to share! The repetition of the engaging theme song coupled with the dance steps executed by celebrities really participated in creating funny videos that the viewers were probably eager to share with their friends. Hence the average 50.000 views on the 30 seconds videos.
  • Series effect: by repeating some elements (visual, song, steps) in every videos they succeeded in creating a series that people could follow. We have to admit that the song plays an important role in the success of this series. They did a great job choosing/creating it. To our knowledge it is the first time a fair trade organization publishes a series of online videos that has nothing to envy the Coca Cola’s and Apple’s of this world.
  • Fresh: this is not what we are used to with videos coming from the fair trade industry. The Fairtrade Foundation managed to do something different without surfing the usual wave of the farmers, the fairer price or the impact on the communities. All that is implied but not directly put in front of us (except for the campaign presentation video). Instead of hitting us one more time with the same ol’ message, they decided to entertain us. Very clever. Remember to stand in your audience’s shoes when you create content. Ask yourself: “What might they like?”

What we liked the most:

  • Cross Media Campaign: the “Take a Step” campaign was really an example of a global campaign. The Fairtrade Foundation echoed the campaign using all the social media tools available. Be it their website, blog, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Flick’r, Tumblr or Google+ they were all thoroughly prepared to speak with one voice, giving the larger audience the same message: take a step for fairtrade. It takes a lot of efforts and coordination to create that kind of unity throughout so many different channels.

Now we need to figure out a way to get that song out of our heads!

About Ronny Hermosa

I'm video producer and a consultant in social media marketing. With this blog, I want to share some knowledge about social media with Fair Trade producers hoping this will strengthen their organizations.