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Tag Archives: Ronny Hermosa

Pekerti: Fair Trade Wooden Handicrafts from Indonesia

Pekerti: Fair Trade Wooden Handicrafts from Indonesia

Photos by Wanwisa Taesuwan & Sandy Hermosa ©FairTradeConnection You can purchase these photos by contacting us: ronny@fairtradeconnection.org Read More »

Miss Saparot and the pineapple factory

Late afternoon on Thursday the 30th January in Udonthanee, I picked up the phone after it rang a few times “Hi, is that Khun Tukta from Fair trade connection?” the voice of the lady asked me with an hesitating and cheerful tone. “Yes, it’s me. How are you khun Kook?” I responded with her name as it showed on my mobile screen earlier. She continued “We would like to inform you that the Co-operative has agreed for Fair Trade Connection to come over and produce the video about us” a big smile appeared on my face and then we discussed about the job. After hanging up the phone with Khun Kook I hurried to report the good news to Ronny, we were both excited and started to organize our trip to Samroiyod already. Samroiyod sub-district is located in Prachuabkeerikhun province; it is one of the main pineapple growing areas in Thailand. 1/3 of the region (or 161,440 rais) is used to farm pineapples and 50% of the locals are farmers, hence the importance of pineapple farming for providing jobs and income to the local population. Pineapple is one of the main exporting goods for Thailand, each year they export approximately 2.5 million tons of fresh and processed pineapples. In the area of Samroiyod there are many processed pineapple factories, most of which export to Western countries such as the US, England, Holland, Switzerland, Germany, Spain, Italy and many more. But the only place that grows and produces fair trade canned pineapples is the farmers fair trade cooperative of Samroiyod (SRI) and Samroiyod Co,Ltd (the processing factory). The cooperative has been established 5 years ago and the factory has been certified fair trade for 6 or 7 years. We have been shooting for 4 days at the different locations: pineapple farms, cooperative office and the Samroiyod factory. They were very welcoming with us, providing a lot of useful information and trying ... Read More »

Samroiyod Fair Trade Pineapple Growers, Thailand

Samroiyod Fair Trade Pineapple Growers, Thailand

Photos by Wanwisa Taesuwan & Ronny Hermosa ©FairTradeConnection You can purchase these photos by contacting us: ronny@fairtradeconnection.org Read More »

Sang Arun, Fair Trade Ceramics from Northern Thailand

Sang Arun, Fair Trade Ceramics from Northern Thailand

Photos by Wanwisa Taesuwan & Ronny Hermosa ©FairTradeConnection You can purchase these photos by contacting us: ronny@fairtradeconnection.org Read More »

The Revolution Fair Trade Needs

The Revolution Fair Trade Needs

We have always believed in the benefits of fair trade for marginalized producers and were strong supporters of the movement even before starting Fair Trade Connection. Being on the road for so long and meeting so many of them has just confirmed our initial feeling that fair trade contributes to lifting small producers out of poverty and gives them more control over their lives. We have been to the villages, talked to the artisans, shared meals with their families, visited their houses and spent hundreds of hours getting to know them. What comes out is a huge collection of testimonies all pointing out to the same reality: fair trade products are made with love and the income that they generate do create better lives. Our job now is to tell you these stories, so that just like us, you can realize that fair trade does make a difference. Fair Trade and Social Media Most Western fair trade organizations (retailers and labeling organizations) have already adopted Social Media and use them as part of their marketing efforts to different extents. Social Media is now the name of the game, even for fair trade. Organizations share all kinds of content on different Social Media platforms. Many of them provide information about the products they sell, raise awareness through advocacy campaigns, communicate about events that they organize and so on. We believe that the positive growth of fair trade sales (12% increase since 2010 according to Fairtrade International) could be, at least partially, explained by the ever growing use of social media to promote the movement. We see in social media the perfect tool for further connecting producers and consumers. One tool in particular caught our attention… QR Codes If you’ve been in a public space in the last year or two, you’ve probably seen a QR (Quick Response) code —a small, square two-dimensional barcode that looks a bit like a miniature chess ... Read More »

Soluna: Argentina’s Premium Fair Trade Wine

Soluna: Argentina’s Premium Fair Trade Wine

Most of the time we work with handicraft producers. So we were particularly happy when Gabriela, the owner of Bodega Furlotti, accepted our offer to shoot a movie about the Soluna wines. We thought about contacting the people behind the Soluna wines because in 2010 we made a video about a contest organized in Belgium by Max Havelaar: the election of the best fair trade wine distributed in the country. The Soluna Malbec 2006 won the competition (best red) and since we were in Argentina we decided to pay them a visit. It only took us 33 hours of bus to get there but the Mendoza scenery was really worth it. The red, yellow and orange of the autumn leaves contrasted with the bright blue of the sky and the white of the snowy peaks of the Andes in the background. Beautiful. We quickly learned that in order to produce a fair trade wine, one needs to have fair trade certified grapes. So part of our job would consist of meeting the small vineyard owners and farmers who form the Viña de la Solidaridad cooperative. We also learned about the contratistas. The contratistas represent a unique and traditional labour relationship in Argentina. As they are not land owners, these workers, who are essential to the maintenance of vineyards, formed strong partnerships with vineyard owners. In addition to receiving base wages, contratistas are also entitled to a percentage of the vineyards revenues. In our 3 video series you’ll discover these contratistas (Omar, Rosa and Oscar) as well as small vineyard owners (Eduardo and Francisco) and of course the bodega that produces the Soluna. We hope that after viewing this series, you’ll understand the importance of the fair trade certification for these small producers and that you’ll see the Soluna wines with different eyes. Cheers! target=”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGYxZ72Bz6I target=”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhCR4inWoAk target=”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qdbghl9syDM Read More »

Equitable Marketing Association (E.M.A)

Equitable Marketing Association (E.M.A)

After working with Pushpanjali in Agra, we flew to Kolkata to meet the second fair trade organization: E.M.A. We thought we would arrive and work in the mega city of Kolkata, so we were prepared for some urban experience but rather than that we were driven to a lovely countryside compound 40 Km from the city center. E.M.A.’s staff welcomed us with a little ceremony, incense sticks were burnt, we received flowers and masala chai. E.M.A. really knows how to receive guests! The next day we had our first meeting with the staff and planned the shooting of our second fair trade video. What is particular about E.M.A. is that they have a production center were people come to work unlike Pushpanjali that buys products that artisans produce in their villages. Technically this was really convenient for us, no need to go to far away villages to get the footages and interviews. Enough talk, here is the second webisode of Fair Trade Connection about Equitable Marketing Association. target=”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxPjYmgOMyE target=”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8gxI_XXvx4 target=”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvrrbWcBMoM Read More »

Pushpanjali: Working with marginalized producers

Pushpanjali: Working with marginalized producers

Everything started when we told Oxfam Magasins du Monde about our project to go meet the fair trade producers and produce videos about them. That was around November of 2010. We just finished editing our first movie ever about the Fair Trade Week in Belgium for the Belgian Technical Cooperation. Oxfam immediately saw the opportunity that was presented to them: a way to obtain hard to get quality photo and video material about their producer partners in the South. Because we didn’t have much experience in video editing yet, Oxfam’s first reaction was to ask us to make the shootings only, they would pay someone else to do the editing. It was a start.At this stage we decided to move to Tunisia and start shooting fair trade videos there. We had the chance to work with Beni Ghreb Hazoua and South Organic, both dates producers in Southern Tunisia. When discovering our work about these two Tunisian organizations, Oxfam changed its mind and asked us to take care of the editing of their future videos as well. We were very proud to hear that! It meant that Fair Trade Connection had gone a long way since its early days and that the quality of our work was increasing. Back from Tunisia we had a series of meetings with Oxfam to fine tune the details of our collaboration and we agreed on making fair trade videos about 7 of their partners: Pushpanjali and E.M.A. in India, Dhaka Handicrafts in Bangladesh, alura amara in Indonesia, Pueblos del Sur in Chile, MCCH in Ecuador and Bombolulu in Kenya. The videos will serve Oxfam’s marketing efforts and be uploaded to their website. With them, they want to do exactly what Fair Trade Connection has been created for: telling the story that is behind the product. For each producer organization Oxfam asked us to produce a series of 3 videos: an Introduction: telling about the socio-economic ... Read More »

Fair Trade and Social Media: Watch & Learn 01 [@FairtradeUK]

Fair Trade and Social Media: Watch & Learn 01 [@FairtradeUK]

The more producers’ organizations we meet on the road, the more we understand the importance of Social Media as a way to promote your fair trade business. Indeed, Social Media is a great way to engage with potential new customers, give more information about your social project and products, but it is also very useful to keep an eye on market trends and latest fashions. About half the fair trade organizations we visited in Asia were already active on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube, the other half seemed really enthusiastic about getting started. Fair Trade Connection is all about connecting fair trade producers with consumers so we quickly understood that in order to do so, we needed to train the non-initiated so that they too could leverage the potential of Social Media Marketing. The “Watch & Learn” series is a collection of Social Media best practices in the fair trade industry that we gathered and analyzed for you. This 1st post will be analyzing the videos of the amazing “Take a step for Fairtrade” campaign by the Fairtrade Foundation. The @FairtradeUK in the title of this post is their Twitter name, so go ahead and follow them if you want. Let’s jump to the heart of this campaign and start with the presentation video: 1/ The Campaign presentation Video What we liked: Strong Corporate Identity: the Fairtrade Foundation really does a good job being consistant with the look and feel of their messages. One should establish a corporate document stating which typography and fonts, colors and shades, logotypes and declinaison logos your company will be using to comunicate. And most importantly stick to it! Appropriate Music: the rythm of the video is given by the music. See how the text is synchronized with the music. Sync your visuals with the music to create greater impact on your viewers. Proper use of Sound Effects: the additional sound effects helps the viewer relate ... Read More »

Dhaka Handicrafts: working for the artisans

Dhaka Handicrafts: working for the artisans

With around 165.000.000 people, Bangladesh is the 7th most populated country of the world though we barely hear about it in the news. A large percentage (30%) of the population lives with less than 1US$ a day and child labour is widely spread in Bangladesh as a consequence of poverty. So here more than elsewhere, Fair Trade has an important role to play in order to provide better living conditions. During our visit to Dhaka, we met and worked with Dhaka Handicrafts, a fair trade organization that mainly produces basketery items. They focus on helping women in rural areas by providing them work so that they can become an “earning source” in the family which means more respect and freedom of expression. Discover the great work that they are doing with this presentation video by Fair Trade Connection.   Read More »